Getting EVs where we need them in multi family and low-income communities

They seem to be everywhere. A pickup rolls up to a dark house in a storm during the Olympics and the house lights come on. (And even powers a product launch event when the power goes out!) The Governator throws lightning bolts like Zeus in a Super Bowl ad touting them. The top manufacturer is among the most valuable companies in the world and the CEO is a cultural icon. Electric vehicles (EVs) or cars are making a splash in the state.

The Ford F-150 Lightning pick up generated so much excitement last summer that it had to increase its initial roll out from 40,000 to 80,000 to 200,000 due to demand. General Motors answered with electric versions of the Silverado and Hummer. (Dodge is bringing up the rear with its Ram and Dakota pickups.)

Much of this has been spurred by California’s EV sales mandates that date back to 1990. The state now plans to phase out the sale of new cars and passenger trucks entirely by 2035, with 35% of sales by 2026. In the first quarter of 2022, EVs were 16% of new car sales.

While EVs look they will be here to stay, the question is where will drivers be able to charge up? That means recharging at home, at work, and on the road when needed. The majority of charging—70% to 80%–occurs at home or at work. Thanks to the abundance of California’s renewable energy, largely from solar power including from rooftops, the most advantageous time is in the middle of the day. The next big hurdle will be putting charging stations where they are needed, most valuable and accessible to those who don’t live in conventional single-family housing.

The state has about 80,000 public and shared private chargers, of which about 10% are DC “fast chargers” that can deliver 80% capacity in about 30 minutes. Yet we likely need 20 times more chargers that what we have today.

Multi-family housing is considered a prime target for additional chargers because of various constraints on tenants such as limitations on installing and owning a charging station and sharing of parking spaces. Community solar panels can be outfitted with charging stations that rely on the output of the panels.

California has a range of programs to provide incentives and subsidies for installing chargers. Funding for another 5,000 chargers was recently authorized. The state funds the California Electric Vehicle Infrastructure Project (CALeVIP) that provides direct incentives and works with local partners plan and install Level 2 and DC fast charging infrastructure. This program has about $200 million available. The program has 13 county and regional projects that contribute $6,000 and more for Level 2 chargers and often $80,000 for a DC fast charger. A minimum of 25% of funds are reserved for disadvantaged and low-income communities. In many cases, the programs are significantly oversubscribed with waiting lists, but the state plans to add enough funding for an additional 100,000 charging stations in the 2022-23 fiscal year, with $900 million over the next four years.

California’s electric utilities also fund charging projects, although those programs open and are quickly oversubscribed.

  • Southern California Edison manages the Charge Ready program with a focus on multi-family properties including mobilehome parks. The program offers both turn-key installation and rebates. SCE’s website provides tools for configuring a parking lot for charging.
  • San Diego Gas & Electric offered Power Your Drive to multi-family developments, with 255 locations currently. SDG&E has added the Power Your Drive Extension to add another 2,000 charging stations over the next two years. SDG&E will provide up to $12,000 for Level 2 chargers and additional maintenance funding.
  • Pacific Gas & Electric offered the EV Charge program in which PG&E will pay for, own, maintain and coordinate construction of infrastructure from the transformer to the parking space, as well as support independent ownership and operation. The program is not currently taking applications however. PG&E’s website offers other tools for assessing the costs and identifying vendors for installing chargers.
  • PG&E is launching a “bidirectional” EV charging pilot program with General Motors that will test whether EVs can be used to improve electric system reliability and resilience by using EVs as back up energy storage. The goal is to extend the program by the end of 2022. This new approach may provide EV owners with additional value beyond simply driving around town. PG&E also is setting up a similar pilot with Ford.
  • Most municipally-owned electric utilities offer rebates and incentives as well..

Community residents have a range of incentives available to them to purchase an EV.

  • The state offers $750 through the Clean Fuel Reward on the purchase of a new EV. .
  • California also offers the Clean Vehicle Rebate Project that offers $1,000 to $7,000 for buying or leasing a (non-Tesla) to households making less than $200,000 or individuals making less than $135,000. Savings depend on location and vehicle acquired.
  • Low-income households can apply for a state grant to purchase a new or used electric or hybrid vehicle, plus $2,000 for a home charging station, through the Clean Vehicle Assistance Program. The income standards are about 50% higher than those establishing eligibility for the CARE utility rate discount. The average grant is about $5,000.
  • The federal government offers a tax credit of up to $7,500 depending on the make and model of vehicle.
  • Car owners also can scrap their gasoline-fueled cars for $1,000 to $1,500, depending on household income.
  • Several counties, including San Diego and Sonoma, have offered EV purchase incentives to county residents. Those programs open and fill fairly quickly.

The difference between these EVs coming down the road (yes, that’s a pun) and the current models is akin to the difference between flip phones and smart phones. One is a single function communication device, and we use the latter to manage our lives. The marketing of EVs could shift course to emphasize these added benefits that are not possible with a conventional vehicle. We can expect a similar transformation in how we view energy and transportation as the communication and information revolution.

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